Interesting Facts About Arizona

Enjoy these interesting facts about Arizona.

Arizona Facts

• The Grand Canyon is 227 miles long, 1 mile deep, and has an average width of 10 miles.
• Located in Fountain Hills is a fountain believed to be the tallest in the world.
• Four Corners is noted as the spot in the United States where a person can stand in four states at the same time.
• Navajo Community College in Tsaile, was the first college on an Indian reservation.
• The age of a saguaro cactus is determined by its height.
• The Apache trout is considered a threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act.
• Arizona, among all the states, has the largest percentage of its land set aside and designated as Indian lands.
• Rising to a height of 12,643 feet, Mount Humphreys north of Flagstaff is the state's highest mountain.
• Arizona observes Mountain Standard Time on a year round basis, never observing daylight savings time.
• Arizona is roughly the size of Italy.
• Arizona State Tree: Palo Verde
• Arizona State Flower: Saguaro Cactus Blossom
• Arizona has the largest percentage of its land set aside and designated as Indian lands.
• The Anasazi Indians made waterproof baskets that they cooked in. They put hot rocks in with the food to cook it.
• When Became a State: February 14, 1912
• State Capitol: Phoenix
• Bisbee, located in Tombstone Canyon, is known as the Queen of the Copper Mines. During its mining history the town was the largest city between Saint Louis and San Francisco.
• The state's most popular natural wonders include the Grand Canyon, Havasu Canyon, Grand Canyon Caves, Lake Powell/Rainbow Bridge, Petrified Forest/Painted Desert, Monument Valley, Sunset Crater, Meteor Crater, Sedona Oak Creek Canyon, Salt River Canyon, Superstition Mountains, Picacho Peak State Park, Saguaro National Park, Chiricahua National Monument, and the Colorado River.
• The Arizona tree frog is the state official amphibian. The frog is actually between three-quarter to two inches long.
• Arizona has more parks and national monuments than any other state, more mountains than Switzerland, and more golf courses than Scotland
• The hottest recorded day in Phoenix was June 26, 1990, when the temperature hit 122 degrees.
• The original London Bridge was shipped stone-by-stone and reconstructed in Lake Havasu City.
• In World War II, many Navajos enlisted as secret agents. Our enemies could never understand the Navajo language to learn our military secrets. • The sun shines in southern Arizona 85% of the time, which is considerably more sunshine than Florida or Hawaii. Arizona also frequently has the hottest and coldest temperatures on the same day. The temperature could be 75 degrees in the desert to 45 degrees in the high country.
• The state's precipitation varies. At Flagstaff the annual average is 18.31 inches; Phoenix averages 7.64 inches; and Yuma's annual average is 3.27 inches.
• Crops include 2%; pastureland 57%; forests 24%; and other uses are 17% in land-use designation.
• The Arizona ridge-nosed rattlesnake is perhaps the most beautiful of all eleven species of rattlesnakes found in Arizona.
• Camels were used at one time to transport goods across Arizona.
• Four Corners is the spot in the United States where a person can stand in four states at the same time.
• World War II brought many military personnel to train at Luke and Thunderbird fields in Glendale.
• The Castilian and Burgundian flags of Spain, the Mexican flag, the Confederate flag, and the flag of the United States have all flown over the land area that has become Arizona.
• In 1926, the Southern Pacific Railroad connected Arizona with the eastern states.
• The geographic center of Arizona is 55 miles (89 kilometers) southeast of Prescott.
• Arizona's most abundant mineral is copper.
• Once a rowdy copper mining town, Jerome's population dwindled to as few as 50 people after the mines closed in 1953.
• The original London Bridge was shipped stone-by-stone and reconstructed in Lake Havasu City.
• The capital of the Navajo Reservation is Window Rock.
• The colors blue and gold are the official state colors.
• Historically, Arizona’s strongest economic support came from the Four C’s – cotton, copper, cattle, and citrus. In recent years, a fifth – climate – has been added.

Arizona